Annual Conference

Sustaining Ethical Care through Resistance and Conscientious Commitment

21st International Nursing Ethics Conference
6th International Ethics in Care Conference

June 6-7,  2020 Postponed Until 2021 Due to COVID19 Pandemic
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Description

This year’s conference theme examines the place of conscientious commitment and resistance in building and sustaining moral agency within current healthcare systems. These practices require that nurses and other healthcare practitioners provide needed care in the face of the perception of unjust laws and policies, social disapproval, and/or a lack of organizational support. How can these practices be? What are their limits? How are they related to professional identity?

Issues related to the conference theme will be addressed by international experts and scholars in the field of ethics and nursing. Ample opportunity will be afforded for interactive dialogue and discussion with keynote speakers and panelists.

Preliminary schedule can be found here

Registration and abstract submission information can be found here :

https://bloomberg.nursing.utoronto.ca/pd/ethics-conference

Objectives

Practitioners, researchers, educators, managers and students in the field of health and social care from around the world are invited to attend and participate in this conference to engage in ongoing discussions about these questions in relation to how ethical care can best be sustained in the context of issues related to conscientious commitment and resistance.

Location

Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Audience

  • Practitioners
  • Researchers
  • Educators
  • Managers
  • Students

Want more conference?

Conference participants may also consider attending the Canadian Bioethics Society Conference which will be held in Toronto on June 3-5, 2020 – the days immediately preceding the International Ethics Conference on June 6 & 7. https://www.bioethics.ca/

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Abstracts are invited for the 21st International Nursing Ethics Conference and 6th International Care Ethics Conference. For eligibility and deadlines please read the Submission GuidelinesDeadline: 5:00 pm (EST), February 24, 2020.

Please complete this form to submit an abstract for an oral presentation in the concurrent sessions to address the main theme – Sustaining Ethical Care through Resistance and Conscientious Commitment. You do not have to register for the conference at the time of your abstract submission but you must register and pay the full conference registration fee in order to present. By registering for the conference, you will be authorizing the publication of your abstract in the conference materials. If you have any questions, please contact us at pd.nursing@utoronto.ca.

Guidelines for Submission of Abstracts

This year’s conference theme examines the place of conscientious commitment and resistance in building and sustaining moral agency within current healthcare systems. These practices require that nurses and other healthcare practitioners provide needed care in the face of the perception of unjust laws and policies, social disapproval, and/or a lack of organizational support. How can these practices be fostered? What are their limits? How are they related to professional identity?

Issues related to the conference theme will be addressed by international experts and scholars in the field of ethics and nursing. Ample opportunity will be afforded for interactive dialogue and discussion with keynote speakers and panelists.

Practitioners, researchers, educators, managers and students in the field of health and social care from around the world are invited to attend and participate in this conference to engage in ongoing discussions about these questions in relation to how ethical care can best be sustained in the context of issues related to conscientious commitment and resistance.

Abstracts are invited for oral presentations in the concurrent sessions to address the main theme – Sustaining Ethical Care through Resistance and Conscientious Commitment – before February 24, 2020. Issues of particular interest would include but are not restricted to:

  • Moral agency and identity in global contexts
  • Conscientious commitment and resistance in nursing and care practices
  • Conscientious commitment and resistance in leadership, education, and research
  • Political dimensions of ethics in care
  • Everyday ethical challenges in health and social care
  • The role of ethics education in sustaining ethical care
  • Ethics and professional regulation
  • The contribution of ethical codes
  • Ethical climate in health and social care organisations
  • Moral distress and moral resilience
  • Multi-disciplinary perspectives on ethics in care
  • Philosophical perspectives on ethics in care
  • The future of ethics in care

Keynote Speakers


Franco Carnevale RN, PhD(psych), PhD(phil)

Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, Canada

Franco A. Carnevale is a nurse, psychologist and clinical ethicist. His primary research interests include a wide range of concerns in childhood ethics. He is the founder and principal investigator for VOICE (Views On Interdisciplinary Childhood Ethics); a McGill-based international initiative to advance knowledge and practices relating to ethical concerns in childhood. Dr. Carnevale’s interests include recognizing nurses as moral agents as a better way of understanding what is commonly referred to as ‘moral distress’, and developing strategies for addressing moral distress.


Ann Gallagher PhD, PGCEA, MA, BA (Hons), RMN, SRN

Professor of Ethics and Care, Director International Care Ethics Observatory, School of Health Sciences in the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, UK

Ann Gallagher is Professor of Ethics and Care, Director International Care Ethics Observatory, School of Health Sciences, University of Surrey, UK. Ann is also Editor-in-Chief of Nursing Ethics and has published widely in the field of ethics and care, for example, in relation to dignity, professionalism, ethics education and virtue ethics. She has recently completed a book ‘Slow Ethics and the Art of Care’ which will be published by Emerald in 2020. She is a Fulbright Scholar and a Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing.


Joan McCarthy PhD

Senior Lecturer, Healthcare Ethics, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Ireland

Dr. McCarthy’s research interests include: ethics at the beginning and end of life; nursing and midwifery ethics, and; feminist perspectives on bioethics. She has led, and collaborated on, a number of national and international research projects funded by, e.g., the Irish Hospice Foundation, Wellcome Trust, and the Irish Research Council. Her publications include: End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law, 2011, Cork: Cork University Press (with M. Donnelly, D. Dooley, L. Campbell and D. Smith) and Nursing Ethics, Irish Cases and Concerns, 2012, Dublin: Gill and MacMillan (with D. Dooley).


Panelists


Steve Abdool RN, MA, PhD (c)

Bioethicist, Centre for Clinical Ethics, St. Michael’s Hopsital


Diane Godkin PhD

Senior Ethicist, Regional Ethics Program, Trillium Health Partners
Investigator, Institute for Better Health, Trillium Health Partners
Adjunct Lecturer, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto
Member, Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto
President, Canadian Bioethics Society

Dianne Godkin is Senior Ethicist at Trillium Health Partners (THP). As the lead of the ethics program at a large community academic hospital, she supports ethical decision-making processes from the point of care to the boardroom through her consultation, education, policy, and research work. For the past three years, this has included responsibility for the oversight of medical assistance in dying. Her prior education includes a post-graduate clinical ethics fellowship from the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics and a doctoral degree in nursing from the University of Alberta. She is currently President of the Canadian Bioethics Society. Her research interests include the use of qualitative methods to explore end-of-life decision-making and advance care planning.


Rebecca Greenberg RN, PhD

Senior Bioethicist, Sinai Health System, Toronto
Assistant Professor, Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto

Dr. Rebecca Greenberg is the Senior Bioethicist at Sinai Health System in Toronto, Ontario. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Paediatrics, and a member of the Joint Centre for Bioethics at the University of Toronto.  Rebecca has a Bachelor of Arts (psychology) from the University of Manitoba and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and PhD (bioethics) from the University of Toronto.  Prior to working as a Bioethicist, Rebecca worked as a nurse in the area of general medicine. Her main research interests include pediatric bioethics, ethics education and moral distress.


Christina Lamb RN, PhD

Bioethicist, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, the University of Alberta.

Dr. Lamb is a Registered Nurse and Bioethicist whose program of research, titled the Aletheia Conscience Project (ACP), focuses on conscience and conscientious objection for nurses and healthcare professionals. The aim of the ACP is to raise awareness around conscience as a central component of healthcare education and practice. Dr. Lamb also researches end of life ethics for pediatric populations and has experience in bioethics in the context of maternal, child and newborn health in Rwanda.


Joan Liaschenko RN, PhD, HEC-C, FAAN

Professor, Adult and Gerontological Cooperative, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, USA
Director of Ethics Consult Service, University of Minnesota Medical Center

Joan Liaschenko is a Professor in the Center of Bioethics and the School of Nursing at the University of Minnesota where she is a co-chair of the ethics committee and directs the ethics consult service for the University hospital. Her major research interest is the morality of everyday practices in health care. Her scholarship has included, among others, work on feminist ethics, the moralities embedded in nursing practice and in places of health care delivery, moral agency, moral distress, moral concepts of health and health promotion,  morality and risk, pregnancy and risk, research integrity in clinical trials, communication between families and clinicians at the end-of-life, decision-making in adolescents and young adults undergoing bone marrow transplant,  growth attenuation in severely developmentally delayed children, social justice and health disparities in pandemic planning, and public engagement in pandemic planning.  She has published widely and been a visiting scholar in Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, and New Zealand. She is a consulting editor to Nursing Ethics and on the editorial board of Nursing Philosophy and Nursing Inquiry.


Patricia (Paddy) Rodney RN, PhD

Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
Faculty Associate, UBC Centre for Applied Ethics
Research Associate, Providence Health Care Ethics Services


Anne Simmonds RN, PhD

Associate Professor, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada

Dr. Simmonds’ scholarship focuses on professional identity formation in nursing education and practice, student-faculty collaborative inquiry and curriculum design, and ethical dimensions in perinatal nursing.


David Kenneth Wright PhD, RN, CHPCN(C)

Associate Professor, University of Ottawa

David is a faculty member in the School of Nursing at the University of Ottawa in Ontario Canada. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in ethics at McGill University, and currently maintains an active clinical practice at a freestanding palliative care residence in Montreal. His research seeks to understand, typically from the standpoint of nurses, how values at stake are realized or thwarted in contemporary contexts of end-of-life care. As of 2019, David is the academic lead for the newly launched Palliative Care and Nursing Ethics hub of the Centre for Research on Health and Nursing (a collaboration between the University of Ottawa and the Canadian Nurses Association).